NOW ENROLLING FOR NEW CLASSES!

What we see...

what you hear, you sing; what you sing, you play; what you play, you read; what you read, you write

Interactive contemporary musicianship courses incorporating the piano as practical instrument


New scientific study shows that singing and attending classical music concerts physically reduces stress

Research by the Royal College of Music’s Centre for Performance Science demonstrates the positive benefits of engaging with music

A new scientific study based on research by the Royal College of Music’s Centre for Performance Science has proven what singers and those who regularly attend classical music concerts have long known: that classical music physically reduces stress.

The research was compiled from saliva samples, ECG monitor readings and questionnaires gathered from 15 singers and 49 audience members at a concert given by Eric Whitacre and his Singers at London’s Union Chapel in March 2015. It has been shown that the audience members experienced a reduction in levels of the stress hormones cortisol and cortisone.

For the singers, the same reduction in stress hormones occurred during rehearsal but there was (predictably) an increase in both stress hormones during the performance itself.

‘This is the first time participation in a cultural event has been shown to have significant psychobiological effects’

Aaron Williamson, Professor of Performance Science at Royal College of Music said: ‘This is the first time participation in a cultural event has been shown to have significant psychobiological effects, and the implications are hugely exciting, particularly when taking into account previous research by the Centre for Performance Science which links reduction in stress hormone activity with increases in immune function. This preliminary study provides several new avenues of further investigation of how making and experiencing music can impact on health and wellbeing.’

Summary of psychobiological results was as follows:

Watching a concert as an audience member led to a decrease in stress hormones (cortisol, cortisone and the cortisol-DHEA ratio).
Watching a concert also led to decreases in negative mood states (afraid, tense, confused, sad, anxious and stressed) and increases in positive mood states (relaxed and connected).
Singing in a low-stress rehearsal reduced levels of stress hormones (cortisol and cortisone) and didn’t affect psychological anxiety, but singing in a high-stress concert increased stress hormone levels and psychological anxiety.
The overall act of singing reduced the cortisol-cortisone ratio, suggesting that singing has an inherently relaxing effect regardless of how stressed people feel.

Eric Whitacre, www.gramophone.co.uk, www.msidallas.com